1929-1932 MG M Midget

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The MG M-type was produced by the MG Car company from April 1929 to 1932. It was sometimes referred to as the 8/33. Launched at the 1928 London Motor Show when the sales of the larger MG saloons was faltering because of the economic climate, the small car brought MG ownership to a new sector of the market and probably saved the company. Early cars were made in the Cowley factory, but from 1930 production had transferred to Abingdon.

This 2-door sports car used an updated version of the four-cylinder bevel-gear driven overhead camshaft engine used in the 1928 Morris Minor and Wolseley 10 with a single SU carburettor giving 20 bhp (15 kW) at 4000 rpm. Drive was to the rear wheels through a three-speed non-synchromesh gearbox. The chassis was based on the one used in the 1928 Morris Minor with lowered suspension using half-elliptic springs and Hartford friction shock absorbers with rigid front and rear axles and bolt on wire wheels. The car had a wheelbase of 78 inches (1980 mm) and a track of 42 inches (1067 mm).

1930 brought a series of improvements to the car. The Morris rod brake system, with the handbrake working on the transmission, was replaced a cable system with cross shaft coupled to the handbrake and the transmission brake deleted. Engine output was increased to 27 bhp (20 kW) by improving the camshaft and a four-speed gearbox was offered as an option. The doors became front-hinged. A supercharged version could be ordered from 1932, raising the top speed to 80 mph (130 km/h).

Early bodies were fabric-covered using a wood frame; this changed to all-metal in 1931. Most cars had bodies made by Carbodies of Coventry and fitted by MG in either open two-seat or closed two-door "Sportsmans" coupé versions, but some chassis were supplied to external coachbuilders such as Jarvis. The factory even made a van version as a service vehicle. The car could reach 65 mph (105 km/h) and return 40 miles per gallon. The open version cost £175 at launch, soon rising to £185, and the coupé cost £245. The 1932 supercharged car cost £250.

The M-type had considerable sporting success, both privately and with official teams winning gold medals in the 1929 Land's End Trial and class wins in the 1930 "Double Twelve" race at Brooklands. An entry was also made in the 1930 Le Mans 24 hour, but neither of the two cars finished.

MG M-type Midget
1934 J2
Manufacturer MG Car Company
Production 1929-1932
3235
Predecessor none
Successor MG J-type
Class Sports car
Body style 2-door Roadster
Coupe

1930 M

References

  • MG Sportscars. Malcolm Green. CLB International. 1997 ISBN 1-85833-606-6
  • A-Z of Cars of the 1930's. Michael Sedgwick and Mark Gillies. Bay View Books. 1989. ISBN 1-870979-38-9

External links

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MG_M-type"

1931-1932 MG D Midget

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The MG D-type Midget was produced by the MG Car company in 1931 and 1932. It used the engine from the MG M-type in the chassis from the MG C-type and was only available as a four-seater. Of the 250 cars produced, 208 were open tourers, 37 were salonettes and five went to external coachbuilders.

The car used the M-Type 847 cc engine that was derived from the overhead camshaft engine from the 1928 Morris Minor and Wolseley 10 with a single SU carburettor producing 27 bhp (20 kW) at 4500 rpm. Drive was to the rear wheels through a three-speed non-synchromesh gearbox with a four-speed gearbox was an option on later cars. The chassis came from the C-Type and took the form of a ladder frame with tubular cross members and passed under the rear axle. The suspension used half-elliptic springs and Hartford friction shock absorbers with rigid front and rear axles and centre lock wire wheels, the brakes were cable operated with eight-inch (203 mm) drums. At 84 inches (2134 mm), 86 inches (2184 mm) after the first 100 cars, the wheelbase was longer than the C-Type to cater for the larger body, but the track remained the same at 42 inches (1067 mm).

In spite of its looks the car was not very fast, 60 mph (97 km/h) being just possible in the tourer, the body being really too much for the small engine. The cars are quite rare today, many having been converted into C-Type replicas. At the same time as the D-Type was being made MG was also offering the 6-cylinder 1271 cc F-Type, and externally the two are virtually identical. The extra power of the F-Type made it a much better car, and it proved a bigger seller.

MG D-type Midget
MG D-Type.jpg
Manufacturer MG Car Company
Production 1931-1932
250 made
Predecessor MG M-Type Midget
Successor MG J-type
Class Sports car
Body style four-seat roadster
four-seat Salonette
Engine 847 cc In-line 4

Gallery

References

  • MG Sportscars. Malcolm Green. CLB International. 1997 ISBN 1-85833-606-6
  • A-Z of Cars of the 1930's. Michael Sedgwick and Mark Gillies. Bay View Books. 1989. ISBN 1-870979-38-9

 

External links

 

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MG_D-type"

1931-1932 MG F Magna

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The MG F-type Magna was a six-cylinder-engined car produced by the MG Car company from October 1931 to 1932. It was also known as the 12/70.

Looking for a car to fill the gap between the M-Type Midget and the 18/80, MG turned to another of the engines that had become available from William Morris's acquisition of Wolseley. This was the 1271 cc 6-cylinder version of the overhead camshaft engine used in the 1929 MG M type Midget and previously seen in the 1930 Wolseley Hornet and had dummy side covers to disguise its origins. Fitted with 1 in (25 mm) twin SU carburettors it produced 37.2 bhp (27.7 kW) at 4100 rpm at first, later increased to 47 bhp (35 kW) by revising the valve timing. Drive was to the rear wheels through a four-speed non-synchromesh gearbox of ENV manufacture. The chassis was a 10-inch (250 mm) longer version of the one from the MG D-type with suspension by half-elliptic springs and Hartford friction shock absorbers all round with rigid front and rear axles. Wire wheels with 4.00 x 19 tyres and centre lock fixing were used. The car had a wheelbase of 94 in (2,388 mm) and a track of 42 in (1,067 mm).[2]

With its sloping radiator and long bonnet the F-Type is an attractive car capable of reaching 70 mph (110 km/h). 188 of the cars were supplied in chassis form to outside coachbuilders such as Abbey, Jarvis, Stiles and Windover.[2]

F1 The original F was restricted by only having 8-inch (200 mm) brake drums, which, with its 4-seat bodies, was not really adequate. Many F1 cars have subsequently been fitted with the larger F2 brakes.[2] The four-seat tourer cost £250 and the Foursome coupé cost £289.[2]

F2Introduced in late 1932 the F2 was the open 2-seater car in the range. It also got much needed enhanced braking by fitting larger 12-inch (300 mm) drums all round. The body with straight-topped doors came from the J-Type Midget.

F3 The F3, also introduced in 1932, used the same brakes as the F2 but had the 4-seater tourer and Foursome Coupé bodies fitted. The engine cooling was improved by changing the cooling water flow.

MG F-Type "Magna"
Manufacturer MG Car Company
Production 1931-1932
1250 built[1]
Predecessor none
Successor  
Class sports car
MG F1
Production 1931-1932
Body style 4-seat open tourer
Foursome Coupé
Engine 1271 cc In-line 6
MG F2
MG F2 Magna 2-seater Sports 1932
Production 1932
Body style 2-seat open tourer
Engine 1271 cc In-line 6
MG F3
Production 1932
Body style 4-seat open tourer
Foursome Coupé
Engine 1271 cc In-line 6

References

  • 1 A-Z of Cars of the 1930's. Michael Sedgwick and Mark Gillies. Bay View Books. 1989. ISBN 1-870979-38-9
  • 2 Bayne-Powell, Philip (February 2009). "The Magnas and Magnettes". Safety Fast (MG Car Club) 53: 29-35.
  • MG Sportscars. Malcolm Green. CLB International. 1997 ISBN 1-85833-606-6

External links

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MG_F-type"

1932-1934 MG J Midget

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The MG J-type was produced by the MG Car company from 1932 to 1934. This 2-door sports car used an updated version of the overhead camshaft, crossflow engine, used in the 1928 Morris Minor and Wolseley 10 and previously fitted in the MG M-type Midget of 1929 to 1932, driving the rear wheels through a four-speed non-synchromesh gearbox. The chassis was from the D-Type with suspension by half-elliptic springs and Hartford friction shock absorbers all round with rigid front and rear axles. The car had a wheelbase of 86 inches (2184 mm) and a track of 42 inches (1067 mm). Most cars were open two-seaters, but a closed salonette version of the J1 was also made, and some chassis were supplied to external coachbuilders. The open cars can be distinguished from the M type by having cut-away tops to the doors.

J1 The J1 was the four-seat car in the range. The engine was the 847 cc unit previously seen in the C-type with twin SU carburetors giving 36 bhp. The car cost £220 in open and £225 in Salonette form.

J2 The J2 was the commonest car in the range and was a road-going two-seater. Early cars had cycle wings, but these were replaced in 1933 by the full-length type that was typical of all sports MGs until the 1950s TF. The top speed of a standard car was 65 mph (105 km/h), but a specially prepared one tested by The Autocar magazine reached 82 mph (132 km/h). The car cost £199. There were a few serious failings of the J2, most seriously that it only had a two-bearing crank shaft which can break if over-revved. The overhead-camshaft is driven by a vertical shaft through bevel gears, a shaft which also forms the armature of the dynamo. Thus any oil leak from the cambox seal goes into the dynamo brushgear, presenting a fire hazard. Another problem was that it was not fitted with hydraulic brakes, but had Bowden cables to each drum. These require no more pedal force than any other non-power-assisted drum brake, provided that they are well maintained. The drums themselves are small and even in period it was a common modification to replaced them with larger drums from later models. The non-syncromesh gearbox takes some getting used to, as for any car of this period, but with its short gear stick it becomes second nature to double de-clutch and rare to grind the gears.

J3 The J3 was a racing version with the engine capacity reduced to 746 cc by shortening the stroke from 83 to 73 mm and fitted with a Powerplus supercharger. The smaller engine capacity was to allow the car to compete in 750 cc class racing events. Larger brakes from the L-type were fitted.

J4 The J4 was a pure racing version with light-weight body work and the J3 engine, but using more boost from the supercharger to obtain 72 bhp.

MG J-Type
1934 J2
Manufacturer MG Car Company
Production 1932-1934
2494 made
Predecessor MG C and D Type Midget
Successor MG P-type Midget
Class sports car
Body style 2-door roadster
Salonette
MG J1
Production 1932-1933
380 made
Engine 847 cc Straight-4
MG J2
MG J2 1933 2.jpg
Production 1932-1934
2083 made
Engine 847 cc Straight-4
MG J3
Production 1932-1933
22 made
Engine 746 cc Straight-4
MG J4
MG J4 750ccm75PS 1933.JPG
Production 1932-1933
9 made
Engine 746 cc Straight-4

References

  • A-Z of Cars of the 1930's. Michael Sedgwick and Mark Gillies. Bay View Books. 1989. ISBN 1-870979-38-9
  • MG Sportscars. Malcolm Green. CLB International. 1997 ISBN 1-85833-606-6

 

External links

 

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MG_J-type"

1956-1958 MG Magnette ZB

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The automobile manufacturer MG used the Magnette name on the K-type and N-type cars in the 1930s, but the Magnette models of the 1950s and 1960s are probably best-remembered. Although loved today, the use of the Magnette name on an MG saloon car with a lowered Wolseley body and an Austin engine brought protest from motor magazine letter writers.

There were two distinct series of these Magnettes: The ZA and ZB of 1953 through to 1958 and the Mark III and Mark IV of 1959 through to 1968.

The ZA was replaced by the Magnette ZB in 1956. Power was increased to 64 hp (48 kW) by fitting 1½ inch carburettors, increasing the compression ratio from 7.5 to 8.3,[2] and modifying the manifold.[4] A semi-automatic transmission was an option.

The interior was improved and there was also a Varitone model with a larger rear window and optional two tone paintwork.

The extra power increased the top speed to 86 mph (138 km/h) and reduced the 0-60 mph time to 18.5 seconds.[1]

The similar Wolseley 15/50 now shared the ZB's B-Series engine.

MG Magnette
'55 MG Magnette (Hudson).JPG
1955 MG Magnette
Manufacturer MG Cars
Production 1953-1968
67,596
Predecessor MG YB
Successor MG Montego
Class Mid-size
Body style(s) 4-door saloon
Layout FR layout
MG Magnette ZB
MG Magnette Saloon 1958.jpg
MG ZB Magnette Varitone 1958
Production 1956-1958
18,524[1]
Engine(s) 1.5 L BMC B-Series I4

References

1 Robson, Graham (2006). A-Z British Cars 1945-1980. Devon, UK: Herridge & Sons. ISBN 0-9541063-9-3.
2 Culshaw; Horrobin (1974). Complete Catalogue of British Cars. London: Macmillan. ISBN 0-333-16689-2.
3 "The M.G. Magnette". The Motor. January 5, 1955.
4 "Safety Fast" MG Car Club. September 2007

External links

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MG_Magnette"