MGB GHN3L131923 - 2011 October

We attended three events and enjoyed the fall foliage.

October 1, Apple Harvest Festival in Arendtsville PA. This is a popular vote show open to cars older than 25 year on the fairgrounds of the apple festival. This is a winning event because we go for the food. My favorites are the hot apple cider, apple stuffed sausage topped with sauerkraut and apple butter, and apple turnovers.

October 8, AACA Eastern Fall Meet, Hershey, PA. The Antique Automobile Club of America and museum is headquartered in Hershey. The fall meet has a flee market that covers the entire Hershey Park and Chocolate World. You can not see everything in the flee market in one day. On Saturday, the last day of the event a judged car show is held with the best cars in the country to be see on the field. The MGB did very well in the judging winning a First Preservation award scoring more than 330 of a total 400 points.

October 9, Hunt Country Classic, Middleburg, VA. This all British popular vote show is held in Virginia horse country about 50 miles west of Washington D.C. We drove 120 miles and arrived after the judging started.  The day started cloudy but turned into a sunny warn fall day.  The Willoughby farm is a perfect host for this event.

 

MGB GHN3L131923 - 2008 June Engine

Engine re-build, parts, and machine shop.

Parts
Bearings Main, stock
Bearings Rod, stock
Cam, Advanced Performance Technology APT, VP11 billet
Cam Offset Key, 4 degrees
Cam Sprocket, stock
Crank Rear Seal, stock
Crank Sprocket, stock
Gasket Set Head, Payen
Gasket Set Lower, Payen
Lifters, Advanced Performance Technology APT, CF04
Lock Tab Set, stock
Oil Pressure Valve, stock
Oil Pump, stock
Pistons, AE, 20 over
Push Rods, stock 18V
Rocker Shaft, nitrided
Timing Chain, stock
Timing Chain Tensioner, stock
Timing Cover Oil Seal, stock
Valves Intake, stock
Valves Exhaust, stellite
Valve Guides, magnesium-bronze
Valve Guide Seals, Moss heavy duty
Valve Seats Intake, stock
Valve Seats Exhaust, hardened
Valve Springs Set, stock
Water Pump, stock

Machine Shop
Block, tanked, bored 20 over
Cylinder Head, valve guides installed, valve seats installed
Crank, tanked, checked, polished
Rods, wrist pin bushing checked, pistons installed

Extras
Paint, Dupli-color Dark Canyon Red, Primer, Clear Coat
Oil, Valvoline VR1 20W/50
Antifreeze
Engine Assembly Lube
Spark Plugs
Spark Plug Wires
Distibutor Cap
Points and Condensor
Clutch Kit
 

MGB GHN3L131923 - 2008 April Cylinder Head

The cylinder head was removed from the engine, disassembled, and cleaned. The head was pressure checked by the machine shop and passed for rebuild. I proceeded to give the head a port and polish. The amature port and polish was similar to a stage one modification described in Peter Burgess's book How to Power Tune MGB 4 Cylinder Engines and Sean Brown's Flowspeed website. The head went back to the machine shop for valve guides and hardened seats. Final assembly was performed by me saving a few dollars. New valves, springs and guide seals were installed an the head. A new nitrided rocker shaft replaced the worn shaft. The rockers did not need to be rebushed.

Cylinder head re-build, parts, and machine shop.

Parts
Rocker Shaft, nitrided
Valves Intake, stock
Valves Exhaust, stellite
Valve Guides, magnesium-bronze
Valve Guide Seals, Moss heavy duty seals 290-890
Valve Seats Intake, stock
Valve Seats Exhaust, hardened
Valve Springs Set, stock

Machine Shop
Cylinder head checked for cracks, valve guides installed, valve seats installed

cylinder head cylinder head cylinder head
cylinder head cylinder head cylinder head
cylinder head cylinder head  

MGB GHN3L131923 - 2008 February Gearbox

An overdrive gearbox is not being installed in the GHN3L131923 project. After all the time and effort to locate an overdrive gearbox, correct speedometer, and vacuum switch, one small detail was overlooked. If a D type overdrive gearbox is rare in the US the one that would be correct for a 1967 B with reverse lights would be even harder to find. Why, you ask? The gearbox control tower on a D type Gearbox was modified to mount a reverse light switch. The earlier D type OD gearbox control towers do not have the capablility of simply installing a reverse light switch. The British Leyland parts book shows additional parts no longer available that install in the control tower. The earlier version of the control tower is not machined to allow the additional parts required to activate the reverse switch. No, the D type OD and parts are not for sale, they will fit perfectly in the 1966 B GHN3L106098 project.

The original four speed three syncronized type D non overdrive gearbox in the car is in good condition and will be refreshed for the project. New front and rear seals installed. The oil is drained and replaced with Castrol 20W/50 to specifications. The clutch fork bolt and bushing is replaced with new parts and have a firm movement. The gearbox outer casing is cleaned an wire brushed.

Driveshaft and Hardy Spicer ujoints. Have you ever seen the John Twist, of University Motors 5 minute ujoint video? A five minute ujoint will never happen in my garage. It seems every driveshaft I needed to replace ujoints had them welded in place with rust. My ujoint video would be an hour long with many minutes of five pound hammer beating entertainment. First, at least one circlip will break. Time will be spent chasing the broken circlip around the joint with a hammer and punch until it is pryed loose. A 5/8 inch socket will be destroyed beating out the old ujoint caps. Then the new ujoint install will go smoothly until the last cap has the needle bearings stack and jam. But in the end, the satisfaction of doing it yourself is priceless.

MGB GHN3L131923 - 2007 November Windscreen

windscreen

Windscreen glass replacement, glass polishing and frame polishing. A windscreen was purchased on a popular internet auction. The frame and glass was removed from a 1966 B and the glass was original Triplex. The purchase was originally for the frame which was described in very good condition. The complete windscreen was shipped in a cardboard box without any packing and received in one piece. Upon inspection of the glass it was original Triplex clear and had wiper scratches. After reading and hearing stories of poor replacement glass fit, it was decided to try polishing the glass. A glass polishing kit was ordered from Eastwood Restoration Supplies. This kit contained a thick felt wheel and a powder polishing compound. The directions instructed to mix the compound with water and soak the felt wheel in water. The felt wheel was mounted to the electric buffer. The windscreen was positioned on the workbench with the outside glass facing up. The polishing process started by dipping the felt wheel into the polishing compound paste. The paste was smeared across the glass with the felt pad spinning about 3000 rpm in a east to west motion. A spray bottle of water was kept near to apply additional water when the paste started to dry. The felt pad was moved evenly in an east-west, west-east motion over a one square foot area of the glass. The same was repeated in an north-south, south-north motion. This method was used with over lapping the one square foot of polishing area until the entire windscreen glass was polished. The process was repeated several times until the scratches faded from the glass. After 120 minutes of polishing the results were positive. The wiper scratches were removed from the glass. One last comment, some distortion was noticable in one area of glass at the outside edge of the wiper sweep. The wiper scratches wore a groove in the windsrcreen. Overall the product worked as described.

windscreen
windscreen

Polishing the frame. The best frame of the three in the garage was selected for refinishing. The early chrome bumper cars had a windscreen frame plated with chrome on the top and bottom rails with the side pillars anodized aluminum. The budget did not allow for re-chroming so the windscreen frame was polished and painted. The top and bottom rails are made from extruded aluminum and can be polished to look like chrome. The top and bottom rails were wet sanded with 800, 1000, and 2000 grit sandpaper. When sanding, move the sandpaper in one direction back and forth. Do not use a circular motion. The next step was polishing with a 6 or 8 inch loose flap polishing wheel mounted to a drill press or benchgrinder that can produce 3000 rpms. A white rouge polishing compound was used on the wheel. Polish with the wheel across the wet sanding for the best results. The top and bottom were polished to a brillant shine and maintained with occasional wipe of aluminum polish. The side pillars were wet sanded with 400 grit and painted. The silver paint selected and applied gave the appearance of the original anodized finish. Powder coating or polishing are other options for the side pillar finish.

windscreen
windscreen
windscreen

Installing the glass. The most difficult task on an MGB was squeazing the glass into the aluminum frame followed by mounting the frame with a new frame to car seal. Plenty of lubrication was required on the glass and internally to slide the glass into the frame. Extra hands are needed to help, more than two are required unless ratcheting straps are used in the procedure. In this case, help was not available and four ratcheting straps were used. First, the workbench is cleared and the work area was prepared to accomodate the size of the windscreen and frame. Cover the bench to prevent scratching the glass. The glass was placed on the bench with the ends of the glass on the bench and the curved outside up. Dish detergent and water was applied to the seals and glass. The procedure was started with sliding the bottom rail to car seal into position with extra rubber at each end. Compress the seal toward the center on each end eliminating the chance of shrinking and not fitting to the side pillars. This much more difficult to do later with the side pillars mounted to the top and bottom rails. Next, find and mark the center of the width of the glass and rails. Install the seal around the glass and use plenty of soapy lubrication. The seal will partial side off the top and bottom of the glass. Take the four rachet straps and position the equally along the width of the glass leaving room for the top and bottom rails. Pad the buckles to protect the glass from scratching. Position the top and bottom rails on the seal using the center line guide. Use the ratchet straps to pull the assembly together, note, not much pressure is required and keep the pressure equal across the rails. This may take several attempts given the slippery nature of the glass, seal and rails. Check the rail to glass seal fit and flip the glass over to the center down on the bench and the ends in the air. Carefully remove two of the four straps. The two remaining straps will hold the top and bottom rail to the glass as the side pillars are installed. Place a side pillar to the top and bottom rails and slide the brackets into the rails. Adjust the tension on the straps holding the top and bottom rails if the brackets are not aligned to the rails. Check the bottom rail to body seal and cut to fit tight against the side pillar extension. Add soapy lubrication to the side pillar and start the brackets in the top and bottom rails. Tap the pillar with a large rubber mallot to drive the brackets into the rails. Repeat this step on the other side pillar. Place the two ratchet straps around the windscreen frame from pillar to pillar. One strap at the top and the other at the base of the pillars. Use the straps to draw in the side pillars with sight pressure. Remember to protect the glass from the buckles and clips. The ratchet straps are there as extra hands, some force can be exerted with the straps to assist the pillars into position but the straps will pull or twist the pillars inward. Use the rubber mallot to drive the side pillars into position. The straps will hold the side pillars until the screws can be inserted through the top and bottom rails into the brackets. It is important to use the correct length screws or the glass will break.

windscreen
windscreen

Installing the windscreen to the body. Six bolts hold the windscreen frame to the body, two bolts in the center of the bottom rail to the cowl, and four bolts into the side pillars. Two of those bolts in the side pillars are extremely difficult to access if the dash is in the car. The install prcedure starts with placing the side pillar seals on the posts. Set the windscreen on the cowl placing the to side pillar posts into the wings. Tilt the windscreen forward and start the two center bolts through th bottom rail into the cowl. This is the time for a rope trick. The windscreen to body seal will be curled under, to pull it out a rope can be placed under the seal an pulled toward the front of the car. This uncurls the seal and puts it into the correct position. Place the ends of the windscreen to body seal over the side pillar seals for the correct factory appearance. Apply some windshield sealant under the side pillar seals where they contact the windscreen to body seal. Place a paint mixing stick between the vent windows and the side pillars. This will provide space to prevent the rear of the vent window from stressing the door skin. Push, pull, or whatever it takes to get the windscreen to position to start the bolts into the side pillar posts. Install the top bolts in each side then keeping the loose. Position the windscreen to the vent windows and install the bottom bolt in each side pillar. Tighten all six bolts and the windscreen install is complete.